Mr. Reed

Head Coach of the Grand Haven High School Science Olympiad Team

Grand Haven High School (Grand Haven Area Public Schools)

17001 Ferris Street

Grand Haven, MI 49417

 

Room 0204

reedm@ghaps.org

 

GRAND HAVEN HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE OLYMPIAD

http://soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/S.O.%20Logo_1.jpg

A TRADITION OF EXCELLENCE

 

Two thousand fifteen was the 30th year of Science Olympiad at Grand Haven High School. The history of our team goes back to 1986. This was my 18th year as head coach of the Grand Haven High School Science Olympiad Team and my 25th year overall working with the GHHS team. Our team has won 24 regional championships, 17 state championships, and three national championships. We have competed at the National Science Olympiad tournament each of the last 25 years and we have never placed lower than 12th in the nation.

 

2016 Science Olympiad Dates

 

March 5th, Blue and Gold Scrimmage, GHHS

March 19th, Region 12 Science Olympiad Tournament, Grand Valley State University

April 30th, Michigan Science Olympiad Tournament, Michigan State University

May 21st, National Science Olympiad Tournament, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI

 

Regional Tournament

Results

State Tournament

Results

National Tournament

Results

National Tournament

Locations

1986 1st

1986 8th

1986 Did not qualify

1986 Michigan State University

1987 4th

1987 15th

1987 Did not qualify

1987 Michigan State University

1988 2nd

1988 8th

1988 Did not qualify

1988 Ohio State University

1989 2nd

1989 3rd

1989 Did not qualify

1989 Delaware State College

1990 1st

1990 9th

1990 Did not qualify

1990 University of Colorado

1991 1st 393 points

1991 2nd 315 points

1991 10th 78 points

1991 Penn Valley C.C., KC,MO

1992 1st 417 points

1992 2nd 316 points

1992 8th 75 points

1992 Auburn University

1993 1st 411 points

1993 2nd 285 points

1993 1st 106 points

1993 University of Southern Colorado

1994 1st 426 points

1994 2nd 341 points

1994 1st 345 points

1994 University of Arizona

1995 1st 444 points

1995 1st 395 points

1995 4th 306 points

1995 Indiana University

1996 1st 435 points

1996 1st 369 points

1996 2nd 390 points

1996 Georgia Institute of Technology

1997 1st 388 points

1997 1st 386 points

1997 1st 367 points

1997 North Carolina State University

1998 2nd 411 points

1998 2nd 332 points

1998 4th 618 points

1998 Grand Valley State University

1999 1st 435 points

1999 1st 547points

1999 4th 575 points

1999 University of Chicago

2000 2nd 419 points

2000 1st 556 points

2000 6th 625 points

2000 Eastern Washington University

2001 1st 104 points

2001 2nd 245 points

2001 9th 437 points

2001 University of Colorado Colorado Springs, and USAF Academy

2002 1st 105 points

2002 1st 223 points

2002 9th 438 points

2002 University of Delaware

2003 1st 118 points

2003 1st 196 points

2003 12th 418 points

2003 Ohio State University

2004 3rd 101 points

2004 1st 161 points

2004 2nd 311 points

2004 Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA

2005 1st 64 points

2005 2nd 185 points

2005 7th 397 points

2005 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2006 1st 68 points

2006 1st 124 points

2006 2nd 212 points

2006 Indiana University

2007 1st 59 points

2007 1st 118 points

2007 3rd 251 points

2007 Wichita State University

2008 1st 67 points

2008 1st 169 points

2008 6th 321 points

2008 The George Washington University

2009 1st 98 points

2009 1st 180 points

2009 2nd 205 points

2009 Augusta State University

2010 1st 85 points

2010 1st 116 points

2010 2nd 212 points

2010 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

2011 1st 43 points

2011 1st 85 points

2011 6th 293 points

2011 University of Wisconsin-Madison

2012 1st 66 points

2012 1st 136 points

2012 3rd 235 points

2012 University of Central Florida

2013 1st 60 points

2013 1st 159 points

2013 11th 399 points

2013 Wright State University

2014 1st 75 points

2014 1st 120 points

2014 9th 360 points

2014 University of Central Florida

2015 1st 63 points

2015 2nd 153 points

2015 9th 342 points

2015 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

2016

 

 

2016 University of Wisconsin-Stout

2017

 

 

2017 Wright State University

2018

 

 

2018 Colorado State University

 

 

1st

2nd

3rd

4th

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

11th

12th

13th

14th

15th

Regional

24

4

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State

17

8

1

 

 

 

 

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

National

3

5

2

3

 

3

1

1

4

1

1

1

 

 

 

 

GRAND HAVEN HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE OLYMPIAD TEAM

NATIONAL EVENT CHAMPIONS

 

Year

Event

Students

Coaches

1992

Bridge Building

Megan Fix

Ron Anderson

1993

Bridge Building

Megan Fix

Ron Anderson

1993

Rocks and Fossils

Sarah Tourre

Leon Richardson

1993

Scrambler

Eric Bryant

Aaron Rositch

Ted Schwallie

1994

Its About Time

Sarah Tourre

Kit Heinritz

Paul Greinke

Lane Smith

1994

Mission Possible

Eric Bryant

Troy Hawkins

Kit Heinritz

Liz Powers

Ross Smith

Roger Hordyk

Lane Smith

1994

Water Quality

Megan Fix

Jordan Jonas

Carol Bedford

1995

Amphibians and Reptiles

Kristina Derhammer

Dan Thornhill

Ron Anderson

Shannon Eisenhauer

1995

Water Quality

Jordan Jonas

Lori Oosterbaan

Carol Bedford

Jim Vande Waa

1997

Science of Fitness

Jill Boezwinkle

Jill Feyen

Shannon Eisenhauer

Dennis Striegle

1997

Write It Do It

Craig Boezwinkle

Jill Feyen

Mike Reed

1999

Amphibians and Reptiles

(Trial Event)

Joe Noyce

Sean Patrick

 

2002

Qualitative Analysis

Ryan Cutler

Kristen Downs

Todd Diederichsen

2003

Disease Detectives

Kevin Pallas

Ariane Reister

Julie Olson

2004

Fossils

Mike Ackerson

Eric Domke

Steve Evink

Jason Hunter

2005

Fossils

Jason Ackerson

Eric Domke

Steve Evink

Jason Hunter

2006

Chemistry Lab

Eric Domke

Eleanor Sanford

Jim Vande Waa

2006

Designer Genes

Erin Miller

Helen Worrell

Julie Olson

2006

Forensics

Jenn Burmeister

Helen Worrell

Jim Vande Waa

2006

Rocks and Minerals

Jason Ackerson

Eleanor Sanford

Steve Evink

Jason Hunter

2007

Designer Genes

Jenn Burmeister

Helen Worrell

Julie Olson

2007

Ecology

Bethany Bailey

Jenn Burmeister

Heather Allen

2007

Entomology

Trevor Greene

Helen Worrell

Mike Reed

2007

Forensics

Jenn Burmeister

Helen Worrell

Steffanie Portenga

Jim Vande Waa

2007

Robot Ramble

Alex Cotton

Collin Veele

Robert Monetza

2007

Scrambler

Alex Cotton

Trevor Greene

Tim Graham

Marc Spetoskey

2008

Rocks and Minerals

Nick Ackerson

Alex Vander Meulen

Jason Hunter

2009

Health Science

Kent Brummel

Blake Shultz

Arin Wiegand

2009

Junkyard Challenge

Brian Boomgaard

Jared Sutherland

Robert Monetza

 

2009

Remote Sensing

Alex Vander Meulen

Dan Whisman

Jason Hunter

2010

Anatomy and Physiology

Elizabeth Shay

Blake Shultz

Todd Diederichsen

2010

Dynamic Planet

Nick Ackerson

Leah Matchett

Scott Stanley

2010

Remote Sensing

Nick Ackerson

Dan Whisman

Jason Hunter

2012

Microbe Mission

Sophie Scholtz

Rebecca Shay

Margaret Shay

2013

Forensics

Kaia Hayes

Katie Wampler

Mike Reed

2014

Mission Possible

Perry Benson

Nick Sterenberg

Robert Monetza

 

What is the Science Olympiad?

(Taken from the National Science Olympiad website)

 

The Science Olympiad is an international nonprofit organization devoted to improving the quality of science education, increasing student interest in science and providing recognition for outstanding achievement in science education by both students and teachers. These goals are accomplished through classroom activities, research, training workshops and the encouragement of intramural, district, regional, state and national tournaments. The Science Olympiad tournaments are rigorous academic interscholastic competitions that consist of a series of individual and team events that students prepare for during the year. The competitions follow the format of popular board games, TV shows and athletic games. These challenging and motivational events are well balanced between the various science disciplines of biology, earth science, chemistry, physics, computers and technology. There is also a balance between events requiring knowledge of science facts, concepts, processes, skills and science applications. In addition, during the day there are open house activities that consist of science and mathematics demonstrations, activities and career counseling sessions conducted by professors and scientists at the host institution occurring concurrently with the events.

 

Many states and regions have organized physics, biology or chemistry Olympiads, but few have combined all disciplines in one large Olympiad. The excitement of many students from all science areas competing and cheering one another on to greater learning caused one school district to coin the phrase "intellete". When they searched for a place to house their newly won Olympiad State Championship trophy, the only location available was outside the principal's office in the "athlete" showcase, so they convinced the school board to build an "intellete" showcase. An intellete is any person who demonstrates outstanding performance in an academic or intellectual pursuit (in this case, science). One of the goals of the Science Olympiad is to elevate science education and learning to a level of enthusiasm and support that is normally reserved only for varsity sports programs.

 

The Science Olympiad Mission:

 

To improve the quality of K-12 science education throughout the nation.

 

The Science Olympiad Vision to accomplish this mission is:

 

1. To create a passion for learning science by supporting elementary and secondary Science Olympiad tournaments at building, district, county, state and national levels with an emphasis on teamwork and a commitment to excellence.

2. To improve the quality of K-12 science education throughout the nation to change the way science is perceived and the way it is taught (with an emphasis on problem solving skills and hand-on, minds-on constructivist learning practices). This goal is accomplished through in-depth core curriculum training workshops and the distribution of curriculum materials to thousands of teachers.

3. To celebrate and recognize the outstanding achievement of both students and teachers in the areas of science and technology by awarding thousands of certificates, medals and scholarships.

4. To promote partnerships among community, businesses, industry, government and education. There are over 45,000 volunteers representing these groups at the Science Olympiad events.

5. To improve and restructure the way science is taught and learned by conducting staff development and curriculum development workshops.

 

The specific purposes of the Science Olympiad Tournaments are:

 

1. To bring science to life, to show how science works, to emphasize problem solving aspects of science and the understanding of science concepts.

2. To develop teamwork and cooperative learning strategies among students.

3. To make science education more exciting so more students will enroll in science courses and engage in other science activities like science reading, fairs, meetings and field trips.

4. To promote high levels of achievement and a commitment to excellence, to demonstrate that American students can perform at levels that surpasses expectations of even practicing scientists and engineers.

5. To attract more students particularly females and minorities to professional and technical careers in science, technology and science teaching.

 

Science Olympiad and Grand Haven High School

 

The first Science Olympiad team at Grand Haven High School was in 1986. No one knew how big Science Olympiad would become at Grand Haven High School. The 1986 team won first place in their first regional tournament, and as the saying goes, the rest is history. Grand Haven High School teams have won 24 regional tournaments (the last 11 in a row), 17 state tournaments (the most of any high school team in Michigan), and three national tournaments. At the national tournament, we also have five 2nd place finishes, two 3rd place finishes, and three 4th place finishes (that is, 13 top four finishes in 25 consecutive years of competing at the national tournament). Science Olympiad teams from Grand Haven High School have competed in 25 consecutive national tournaments and have an average place of 5.32 against teams from across the United States. Very few high school Science Olympiad teams in the country can match the record compiled by the Grand Haven High School Science Olympiad teams.

 

What does it take to be part of the Grand Haven High School Science Olympiad Team?

 

To be part of the best Science Olympiad team in the state and one of the best teams in the country takes many hours of study and preparation. We are looking for students who can dedicate and commit to putting all of their efforts into making the Grand Haven High School Science Olympiad team the best team. We are looking for students who have a great interest in science and technology and have excellent academic preparation. We need students who are self-motivated, responsible, honest, mature, and have a thirst for knowledge. We need students who can follow directions easily and who can work well with others.

 

Students on the Science Olympiad team spend at least one hour per week with a coach and the other team members for each academic event in which they are practicing. Outside studying is a necessity for success in Science Olympiad. Students must learn as much as they can about their events in a short amount of time. Practices begin in December and go until the end of the national tournament. The regional tournament is normally held at the end of March at Grand Valley State University. The state tournament is normally held at the end of April at Michigan State University. The national tournament is usually held the third Saturday of May at a different university around the country each year.

 

For more information about the Grand Haven High School Science Olympiad team, please contact Mr. Reed at reedm@ghaps.org

 

 

 

 

http://soinc.org/sites/default/files/uploaded_files/S.O.%20Logo_1.jpg